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Guru Nanak Multi Academy Trust

Computing

Computing is a compulsory subject from Year 7-11. The curriculum is revised year on year to reflect the changes in ICT and therefore equip students with skills appropriate to work and life. The department has 3 discrete teaching rooms (there are 3 rooms also available for cross curricular use) and students have access to a range of devices to enhance their learning.

The main aim of the department is to ensure that students are given the opportunity to learn skills which are pertinent to life today and as a result, topics covered are revised each year in line with developments in technology. Students are encouraged from the outset to be independent learners and to be confident in their use of ICT.

We offer lunchtime clubs whereby students can learn more aspects of Computing related to Programming. Activities include animation, gaming and programming.

Key Stage 3

In Year 7 students have the opportunity to develop their skills in the following applications:

  • Office Applications with specific focus on Access and Excel
  • Web Design
  • Python Programming
  • App development

Students also learn about hardware, software and legislation.

In Year 8 students build on the knowledge and skills acquired in Year 7 alongside working with new software:

  • HTML, using Notepad++
  • Future technologies and the impact on our lives
  • Being able to create, populate and manipulate a database
  • Python programming
  • Binary and Algorithms
  • Web Design

In Year 9 students follow a programme of study designed to develop the skills and knowledge required by the courses at GCSE which further prepare them for studying this subject at GCSE:

  • Web design using HTML
  • Investigating the benefits of social networking
  • Developing their awareness of the moral, ethical, environmental and legal issues relating to ICT
  • Advanced uses of Excel and Access
  • Further programming using Python

Assessment

Students are assessed at the end of each unit of study and then three times during the year students will be given a report grade to reflect their Computing capability.

Key Stage 4

CIDA

This qualification aims to:

  • equip young people with the knowledge, understanding and skills they need to design and make, effective digital products for others to use
  • enable young people to use digital tools as a means of expression to inform, persuade and entertain
  • foster young people’s creativity and develop their independent learning skills
  • challenge young people to reflect on what they produce and strive for excellence
  • increase young people’s awareness of their responsibilities in the digital world and their respect of other people’s rights
  • equip young people with professional, real-world skills in planning, project management and communication
  • give young people the knowledge, understanding and skills they need to support future learning and exploit the creative digital industries.

During the course students will complete two units:

Unit 1: Developing Web Products

Students will need to complete a 2.5 hour practical computer-based examination. There will be one task divided into two activities.

In the first activity, they will have to use web authoring software and other software tools to create a web product for a specified audience and purpose, using a client brief. In the second activity, they have to evaluate their product.

This unit will be completed in the first term of Year 10.

Unit 2: Game Making

In order to complete their coursework students will initially spend time looking at games they enjoy, evaluating the features which make them enjoyable and effective. Students will then begin to work through the process of developing their own game for a chosen audience and purpose.

  • Learn about the different types of computer games created by others
  • Learn about features which can be incorporated into successful games
  • Learn how to use a moodboard to show other people what you have in mind and how it can be used to provide information about the game
  • Be able to explain how you will test the game for functionality and playability.
  • Learn how to make use of feedback from others, how to explain the choices you have made and how to be flexible enough to make changes to your plans in response to feedback.
  • Games must be carefully designed if they are to work as intended and be fun to play.
  • Develop your game taking into consideration feedback from others
  • Create a promo that attracts interest and persuades people to play
  • Review the strengths and weaknesses of games by evaluating factors,

ASSESSMENT:

The final GCSE mark is made up of two components:

1. Unit 1 – Practical examination (2.5 hours – 25%)

2. Unit 2 - Coursework (75%)

GCSE ICT

During the course students will complete two units:

Unit 1: Living in a Digital World

Overview of content

  • In this unit students explore how digital technology impacts on the lives of individuals, organisations and society.
  • They learn about current and emerging digital technologies and the issues raised by their use in a range of contexts (learning and earning, leisure, shopping and money management, health and wellbeing and on the move).
  • They develop awareness of the risks that are inherent in using ICT and the features of safe, secure and responsible practice.

Unit 2: Using Digital Tools

This is a practical ‘making task’ that enables students to demonstrate their ICT skills techniques using a range of software applications in order to produce effective ICT solutions in a range of contexts. They learn to reflect critically on their own and others’ use of ICT and to adopt safe, secure and responsible practice.

ASSESSMENT:

The final GCSE mark is made up of two components:

1. Unit 1 - Written Paper (1.5 hours – 40%)

2. Unit 2 - Controlled Assessment (40 hours – 60%)

The controlled assessment tasks have replaced what was traditionally referred to as coursework. All of the controlled assessment tasks must be completed in a supervised environment. The maximum time allowed for completing each controlled assessment is 40 hours.

Students will complete the Unit 2 controlled assessment during Year 10.

GCSE Computer Science

The aims of the Pearson Edexcel GCSE in Computer Science are to enable learners to:

  • develop knowledge and understanding of the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science
  • develop and apply computational thinking skills to analyse problems and design solutions across a range of contexts
  • gain practical experience of designing, writing, and testing computer programs that accomplish specific goals
  • develop the ability to reason, explain and evaluate computing solutions
  • develop awareness of current and emerging trends in computing technologies
  • develop awareness of the impact of computing on individuals, society and the environment, including ethical, legal and ownership issues
  • communicate computer science concepts and explain computational solutions clearly and concisely using appropriate terminology.

During the course students will complete two units:

Unit 1: Principles of Computer Science

Overview of content

  • Understanding of what algorithms are, what they are used for and how they work; ability to interpret, amend and create algorithms.
  • Understanding of binary representation, data representation, data storage and compression, encryption and databases; ability to use SQL to insert, amend and extract data stored in a structured database.
  • Understanding of components of computer systems; ability to construct truth tables, produce logic statements and read and interpret fragments of assembly code.
  • Understanding of computer networks, the internet and the world wide web; ability to use HTML and CSS to construct web pages.
  • Awareness of emerging trends in computing technologies, the impact of computing on individuals, society and the environment, including ethical, legal and ownership issues.

Unit 2: Practical Programming

This is a practical ‘making task’ that enables students to demonstrate their computational techniques using the Python programming language. They will:

  • decompose problems into sub-problems
  • create original algorithms or work with algorithms produced by others
  • design, write, test, and evaluate programs.

ASSESSMENT:

The final GCSE mark is made up of two components:

1. Unit 1 - Written Paper (2 hours – 75%)

2. Unit 2 - Controlled Assessment (15 hours – 25%)

The controlled assessment tasks have replaced what was traditionally referred to as coursework. All of the controlled assessment tasks must be completed in a supervised environment. The maximum time allowed for completing each controlled assessment is 15 hours.

Students will complete the Unit 2 controlled assessment during the spring term of Year 11.

Key Stage 5

AS Level

The AS Level, completed in one year, comprises of three units:

  • Unit 6951: The Information Age - students evaluate a range of online services, discuss the impact of ICT on our personal, social and working lives today and look at the Digital Divide. All of this evidence is showcased in a multimedia e-book which has to be fit for purpose and audience.
  • Unit 6952: The Digital Age - students look at a transactional website evaluating the design features and their effectiveness, produce DFDs to show the events which occur when an online purchase is made, consider threats to customer data and measures which can be taken to protect this data, set up and use a database using a dataset provided by the exam board.
  • Unit 6953: The Knowledge Worker – Spreadsheet skills are extended to enable students to set up spreadsheets and manipulate data accordingly.

Assessment:

Units 6951 and 6952 are both coursework based which are internally assessed and externally moderated.

Unit 6953 is a practical examination lasting 2.5 hours whereby students have to produce a spreadsheet solution to an examination board set scenario.

Key Stage 5

AS Level

The AS Level, completed in one year, comprises of three units:

  • Unit 6951: The Information Age - students evaluate a range of online services, discuss the impact of ICT on our personal, social and working lives today and look at the Digital Divide. All of this evidence is showcased in a multimedia e-book which has to be fit for purpose and audience.
  • Unit 6952: The Digital Age - students look at a transactional website evaluating the design features and their effectiveness, produce DFDs to show the events which occur when an online purchase is made, consider threats to customer data and measures which can be taken to protect this data, set up and use a database using a dataset provided by the exam board.
  • Unit 6953: The Knowledge Worker – Spreadsheet skills are extended to enable students to set up spreadsheets and manipulate data accordingly.

Assessment:

Units 6951 and 6952 are both coursework based which are internally assessed and externally moderated.

Unit 6953 is a practical examination lasting 2.5 hours whereby students have to produce a spreadsheet solution to an examination board set scenario.

A Level

In Year 13 students study a further three units:

  • Unit 6957: Database Software - Database skills are extended to enable students to set up databases and manipulate data accordingly.
  • Unit 6958: Managing ICT Projects – students have to run, organise and manage a project independently. They have to showcase their ability to communicate with stakeholders, plan and manage their time effectively and meet deadlines.
  • Unit 6960: Multimedia – students have to produce a Multimedia product as required by a client.

Assessment:

Units 6958 and 6960 are both coursework based which are internally assessed and externally moderated.

Unit 6957 is a practical examination lasting 10 hours whereby students have to produce a database solution to an examination board set scenario.

ICT